On Imitation

First Section: Imitation by Similar Movement

All imitation, of whatever nature it may be, can only be created in as many ways as there are intervals in the scale, viz: at the unison, at the second, at the third, at the fourth, at the fifth, at the sixth, at the seventh, and at the octave, as well above, and below the tonic.

By Example 139, the manner of treating imitation at the unison has been seen; and now will be given, consecutively, examples of imitations in all the other degrees of the scale. At the end of each example will be seen the word Coda (the Italian term for “tail”), which signifies the conclusion. The coda commences only when the imitation is quitted previous to finishing, – without which, it might go on forever.

Imitation at the second (above)

Imitation at the second (below)

Imitation at the third (above)

Imitation at the third (below)

Imitation at the fourth (above)

Imitation at the fourth (below)

Imitation at the fifth (above)

Imitation at the fifth (below)

Imitation at the sixth (above)

Imitation at the sixth (below)

Imitation at the seventh (above)

Imitation at the seventh (below)

Imitations at the octave

The student should work some time at all these different imitations; but it may just be stated, that he is not rigorously compelled to treat the intonations always at the precise distance of a second, a third, etc. He may, without fear of altering the nature of the intervals, transpose to a higher or a lower pitch: that is to say, – treat the imitation of the second as a ninth; that of the third, as a tenth; that of the fourth, as an eleventh; that of the fifth, as a twelfth; that of the sixth, as a thirteenth; that of the seventh, as a fourteenth; and lastly, that of the octave, as a fifteenth, or double octave. The unison, alone, cannot be displaced.

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  • Last modified: 2018/08/10 15:54
  • by brian